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Language usage questionnaire

There have been requests for me to post more about linguistics (no, seriously; there have), so, here are my usage-questions for you. There are no right answers in usage questions; I'm just curious. And, please, in order for this to be scientific (hah), let me know what variety of English you speak (i.e., where you learned to speak English - and try to be more specific than "America" if you wish to be useful).

1. The past tense of "dive" is:
a. dived
b. dove

2. Splitting an infinitive is:
a. Wrong wrong wrong! Bad bad bad!
b. Fine, if it makes the sentence flow better.
c. What the hell does "splitting an infinitive" mean?

3. For me (i.e., you) there is a difference in pronunciation between "which" and "witch"; and between "Wales" and "whales": True or False?

4. I sometimes pronounce the word "address" with the accent on the first syllable (AD-dress): True or False?

5. Pepsi, 7-Up, Orange Crush, root beer: collectively these are all called:
a. soda
b. pop
c. Coke
d. other (write-in)

6. Just for fun: the shibboleth question: give me the name of a town/locality near you that no outsiders can pronounce right, and try to tell us how it's really pronounced. My example: Willamette, in Oregon (name of a river among other things), is pronounced with the stress on the LAM, not the WILL. Saying WILL-a-met is the sure mark of an outsider.

Comments

cenire
Mar. 23rd, 2003 06:32 pm (UTC)
1. The past tense of "dive" is:
b. dove

2. Splitting an infinitive is:
a. Wrong wrong wrong! Bad bad bad!
(I used to be more choice "b" until I learned it was bad, and I am a Grammarbitch so it now bothers me intensely.)

3. For me (i.e., you) there is a difference in pronunciation between "which" and "witch"; and between "Wales" and "whales": True or False?
False, actually, but I sometimes do hand motions to emphasize which one I mean.

4. I sometimes pronounce the word "address" with the accent on the first syllable (AD-dress): True or False?
True. When I use it as a verb, it's always with the accent on the second syllable; as a noun, usually with the accent on the first.

5. Pepsi, 7-Up, Orange Crush, root beer: collectively these are all called:
a. soda

I'll try to think of an answer for #6 later. :)